Weekly news

Events:

Canberra: Saturday December 6th, 10am-5pm, Christmas drinks at The Asia Bookroom. Japanese Shakuhachi performance, 12-1pm.

What I’ve been reading:

‘Documentaries do not always have to be didactic, says Farida Pacha’, by Sweta Kaushal, in The Hindustan Times.

‘Persian Letters’, by Kevin Schwartz, in Reorient.

‘Stand Up For Your Rights’, by Sabin Iqbal, in Tehelka. Discusses CK Janu, an Adivasi leader from Kerala, who is the subject/author of an interesting book, Mother Forest, that I have written about, academically.

‘The Scatter Here is Too Great by Bilal Tanweer-review’ by Hirsh Sawhney, on The Guardian.

Weekly news

Events:

Delhi: 22-29 November, ‘Extremely Queerious’ week at Fursat-Se Cultural Cafe, Shahpur Jat. Exhibition, poetry, film etc. in celebration of LGBTIQA persons in India.

What I’ve been reading:

‘Ladies Who Lunch’, by Urvashi Butalia, in IQ: The Indian Quarterly.

‘In a complicated relationship with a book’, by Paromita Vohra in Mid.Day. I have one of those reclining reading ladies 🙂

‘The 2013 SAARC Festival of Literature’, in La.Lit. The SAARC summit is currently being held in Kathmandu, and this article–along with so many other non-literary stuff I’ve been reading–points out what a white elephant the organisation is.

‘Book Review: Meena Kandasamy’s The Gypsy Goddess is Undercut with Anger”, by Aishwarya Subramanian, in The Hindustan Times.

‘Funny Moments From India’s Litfest Carnival Circuit’, by Arunava Sinha, on Scroll.in.

Vacancies:

The Caravan, Delhi, seeks Editorial Management Intern. In a previous life I would have loved to apply for this.

Himal Southasian, Kathmandu, seeks Assistant Editors. Take this from someone who has done this, it’s a great experience and a lot of fun. Salary, however, is below subsistence level, important to know from the outset.

Weekly news

What I’ve been reading:

“A bountiful first harvest”, review of Nepali author Chetan Raj Shrestha’s two novellas The King’s Harvest, on La.Lit.

“A new comic strip uses Mughal miniatures to convey contemporary angst”, by Nayantara Narayanan, on Scroll.in.

Events:

Nepal: Kathmandu, Banepa and Birgunj, film screenings 7th November-13th December. ‘Bato Ko Cinema-Movies That Matter-Dignity of Labour‘ series put on by Kathmandu-based arts collective Sattya.

Jaipur: Registrations are open for the annual Jaipur Literature Festival, 21st-25th January 2015. I won’t be going next year, either in five star luxury or more humble accommodations, but it will undoubtedly be good.

New story:

‘A Family Practice’ by Bangladeshi author Farah Ghuznavi is published on New Age.

Weekly news

Events: 

Delhi: 7th November, Himal Lecture 2014: ‘Between the People and the Polis’ by Arif Hasan at the India International Centre.

Excerpts available:

An excerpt of Avtar Singh’s Necropolis  is available here. I just received a review copy of this book, and have worked with Avtar (he is associated with the lovely Indian Quarterly magazine, where my work on Kathmandu street art has been published) so I’m particularly excited about this one. I just hope his novel’s similarity to Jeet Thayil’s award-winning Narcopolis doesn’t cause any confusion!

What I’m reading this week:

‘Logframe of Life’, by Usuru, on La.Lit. A foreigner’s take on expat life in Nepal, featured in the Nepali literary magazine.

‘Narcissistic Gloss’, by Prawin Adhikari, in La.Lit. On a recent Nepali film, Himmatwali.

‘India Court Says Ban on Female Make-up Artists is Illegal’, on BBC news. My WTF moment of the day.

Alice Albinia review’s Mirza Waheed’s new book ‘The Book of Gold Leaves’. I loved his previous novel, The Collaborator, but I think I read it pre-blogging days so don’t have a review.

Blogs:

I have discovered the excellent blog ‘Travelling in the Homeland‘, an Indian literary blog, that does a weekly round-up of the sort I aspire to. Why aspire, and not do? I don’t have as much time for South Asian literature as I once did–my primary job now is academic editing, and I rarely deal with anything South Asian-related in that work. My continuing link to the region lies with my editorial work for Himal Southasian, and my inability to concentrate on any literature that isn’t based in the area. BUT, it is good to aspire, and my blog is a little different in that I take a whole of South Asia approach (hey, I was partially schooled by Himal!) rather than an India focus.