New role at Kitaab

I have recently been given the role of Assistant Managing Editor at Kitaab, a website with the aim of promoting Asian literature in English. I’ve had a few reviews published there before, and now I’ll be taking on a bigger role.

Which means this blog is going to go into hiatus for a while. I may return to it one day, but right now my interest in, and concern to promote, South Asian literature will be met by the role with Kitaab. I encourage you all to follow the Kitaab site, and to look out for me!

Thanks for reading 🙂

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My review of some books on Nepal

The following extract is from Kitaab:

Nepal is a country about which there is an extremely warped image in the minds of outsiders. The stereotypes do not need repeating, because anyone who has not been to Nepal but has given the country even a cursory thought, knows what they are. There is also very little literature available outside of South Asia that engages with the country in any meaningful way—Canadian-Nepali Manjushree Thapa’s fiction and non-fiction being notable exceptions. Therefore, it is refreshing and promising when non-Nepalis with an extensive knowledge of the country turn to literature to record their experiences.

Joe Niemczura’s The Sacrament of the Goddess and Martin David Hughes’ Jaya Nepal! are two fictionalized accounts of American aid workers’ experiences in Nepal, published by small North American presses. They both have at their heart naïve young men with the best of intentions, who find love and friendship in Nepal. Both Niemczura’s protagonist Matt and Hughes’ protagonist Ben end up working in Nepali hospitals—Matt in the small town of Beni (the site of a large battle between Maoists and the Nepali army in 2004) in the Annapurna region, and Ben in an improbably-named settlement on the outskirts of Kathmandu, Pepsicola Townplanning. Both men have experienced love and heartbreak, the underlying reason for their being in Nepal.

Read the rest here.