Review of On the Trail of Taslima by Hanifa Deen (2013) in Himal Southasian 26.3

My review of Hanifa Deen’s On the Trail of Taslima appeared in the print version of Himal Southasian 26.3. Below is an excerpt.

Who is Taslima Nasrin?

A new book unravels the mythology and persona of the controversial author, but when will it reach Southasian readers?

Cover_OnTheTrailOfTaslima_Large
On the Trail of Taslima: An International Human Rights Saga, by Hanifa Deen. Melbourne: Indian Ocean Press, 2013. (Purchased in Australia).

Hanifa Deen, a Melbourne-based author of Southasian descent writing narrative non-fiction (as she calls her genre), has built a career exploring issues related to Islam and women, and particularly to the mutual misunderstandings that often arise between Islam and the Western world. Understandably, Deen has long been intrigued by Taslima Nasrin, best known for the controversy surrounding her 1993 Bengali novel Lajja (Shame), which prompted threats against her life from Islamic fundamentalist groups and forced her into a protracted exile from her native Bangladesh since 1994. Deen included a section about Nasrin (I follow this more common spelling, though Deen prefers ‘Nasreen’) in her 1998 book Broken Bangles, and she returns to the subject in her latest book, the extensively and painstakingly researched On the Trail of Taslima, published in Melbourne earlier this year.

This, however, is not the book’s only avatar. In a slightly different form, On the Trail of Taslima was originally released in 2006 by the US publisher Praeger under the title The Crescent and the Pen: The Strange Journey of Taslima Nasreen. But the US edition was only published in hardback and sold at high cost, and was barely distributed in Australia, where Deen lives. Deen correctly felt that the story, and the enormous amount of research that went into it, deserved wider recognition. In 2012, Deen purchased the paperback rights from Praeger and revised the manuscript to reflect intervening political developments and changes in the lives of her protagonist and informants. She then re-published it herself under her preferred title, which captures the essence of the book and the motivations behind it far better than the original one.

[The rest of the article is in Himal Southasian 26.3, available to purchase here.]

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Elen

Travel writer at www.wildernessmetropolis.com. Editor, writer, traveller, reader, literary critic.

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